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Posts Tagged ‘Employee Turnover’

Employee Turnover and Retention: The Impact of Various Talent Management Practices

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The Great Resignation was among the top headlines in 2021. It highlighted the significance of employee retention. Even though most businesses are aware that the expense of replacing employees is substantial, management is still not putting enough emphasis on retaining their personnel. The possibility is that the failure occurred due to a lack of serious effort or an inability to implement retention effectively. In any case, knowing the interrelationship between turnover, talent management, and retention is critical for HR decision-makers. 

The Global Business and Organizational Excellence journal published their research done in 2021 to investigate talent management practices as a strategic technique for employee retention, to control employee turnover intentions, and to analyze how talent management practices affect employee retention and turnover intentions. This article will go over each of the sub-objectives, hypotheses, and associated outcomes, and then draw conclusions.

Before diving into the study, it may be worth taking into account the employed research method. The proposed hypotheses are tested using a quantitative method-multiple linear regression. The samples used are 236 responses from Indian IT companies. 

The following  are the four sub-objectives that influenced the research on retention intentions:

  1. Recruitment and selection

    The first hypothesis is framed in terms of the impact of recruitment and selection on employee retention: “The higher the degree of satisfaction with the recruitment and selection process, the higher the rate of employee retention.” The result shows that it has a positive effect on employee retention intentions, but was not statistically significant. This means that the recruitment and selection process can affect employee retention intentions, but is not as significant as other practices discussed later.

  2. Performance and career management

    The second hypothesis states that “Employee performance and career management positively affect turnover and retention intentions.” This means that employees who have opportunities for development and career progression are more likely to stay in the company for a longer period of time and feel happier and more loyal to their employers.

  3. Teamwork and management support

    The research’s third hypothesis is that “Teamwork and management support positively affect employee retention intentions.” This proposition is also statistically supported by the result, meaning that teamwork and management support increases employee retention intentions. The result showed that teamwork and management support increases an employee’s retention intentions. Employees that work as a team form bonds and trust with one another, which can help in employee retention.

  4. Salary and compensation

    Last but not least, the fourth hypothesis of the research is that “There is a significant positive association between salary and compensation and employee turnover and retention intentions.” The test revealed that the positive relationship between compensation and retention intentions was approved and statistically significant. Moreover, salary and compensation emerged as the most important factors for employee retention, which is also in line with other research.

In summary, the result of the research highlights the importance of talent management practices on talent retention. The talent retention process starts from recruitment, then the company’s performance management system and team support would provide a comfortable environment for employees to grow and progress their careers. Salary and other forms of compensation are important to attract and retain talent, as salary is one of the primary motives for employment.

These talent management practices each contribute in their own way, but when executed collectively, you may not need to find new talents as frequently as you usually do.

Turnovers and Leveraging Data for Improving Organizational Performance

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When used effectively, data can bring valuable improvements in all areas, including Human Resources (HR). Hugely relevant data is to be found in the area of human capital and is usually collected and managed by the HR department in your company. In essence, all organizations seek to keep top performers while reducing the number of low performers as much as possible. The first thing that comes to mind when discussing measurement in the HR area is the Turnover Rate.

Turnover Rate is a common organizational measurement that tracks the loss of talent in the workforce over time, and it may also be used to gauge an organization’s culture. Employee turnover encompasses resignations, layoffs, terminations, retirements, relocation transfers, and even deaths. Businesses frequently measure their employee turnover rate to estimate its impact on production, customer service, and even morale. Turnover is frequently referenced negatively, owing to its high expense of replacing personnel; however, it is a natural part of the employee life cycle and organizational renewal.

Now, how can data be used for maximum insight from employee turnover?

  1. Gather internal HR data.

    Preparing the data is always the first step. If your organization has an HR Information System (HRIS), you should be able to simply get the data and elicit the desired reports from combining different available metrics. However, if your organization does not have an HRIS, the HR department should be able to provide relevant data that can be analyzed.

    The turnover data you require is the headcount of the organization, as well as the record of persons who have departed the organization: employee name, date of departure, and position should all be included in the record. If you can gather supplementary information, such as the reason for leaving, the direct manager, and so on, it will help to improve the depth of analysis.

  2. Document and organize the data properly.

    After obtaining the turnover data, it is advised that you set up a separate storage folder for this data. It should be well-documented, including periodic details (e.g. for the year 2021). With a well-structured document system, you will be able to access it and even repeat the procedure for the next period.

  3. Run the analysis of data at various levels of granularity.

    This stage is dependent on the data you have available as well as your objective. The number of separations and headcount are the most vital components in calculating the Turnover Rate. The number of departures divided by the average employee headcount is a typical formula for calculating the turnover rate.

    If your data is much more detailed, you can perform a more granular analysis, such as turnover by month and structure. This allows you to gain more specific insight rather than an overall view of the organization. Another example of granular analysis is examining the number of separations and visualizing it by using Structure. The graph will tell you whether there is a certain Structure that needs extra attention; you can also try by Manager, by age, and so on.

This is only a rough idea of how you might use your own internal data to enhance your organization’s retention and engagement. The possibilities for expanding the turnover analysis are limitless. A genuinely effective, high-value data initiative, on the other hand, requires a comprehension of data dynamics as well as how to apply today’s best practices to carefully utilize and assess data.

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